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Screen Time Liberation – 1.5 Years Later

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Screen Time during a Pandemic

Children at table with their books and devices

Exactly one year ago, I wrote a blogpost about screentime for kids during the pandemic and how many of us found ourselves having to loosen our grip on the amount of time our children spend on their electronic devices.  What started off as a “necessary evil” we resolved to as a temporary solution became something more long-term as the pandemic drags on one and half years later.  By now, our pre-conditioned minds start to worry that the kids are getting too “addicted” to their devices.

Little Girls with keyboard and mouse

Encourage a healthy tech habit

Sooner or later, technology would take on a central role in both education and entertainment solutions for the youngest generation, the pandemic seems to have accelerated this development.  Before, parents only needed to be concerned on what TV programs the little ones are watching or the age-appropriateness of their books.  But now we also have to be aware and be vigilant on what the “algorithms” are feeding their little minds, showing them more of what they have been seeing, slowly driving them onto a narrow path of junk consumption and isolation behind the screen.  Luckily, more studies are now immerging on the impact technology and digital content have on young children and we are slowly identifying certain traits and preferences kids of different age groups have.  Through this new found knowledge, maybe we parents can find out how to better guide our kids to develop a healthier tech habit

Two happy kids with headphone and device

If you can’t fight it, use it

Since the beginning of the pandemic (which feels like a lifetime ago), the idea of what should be the appropriate amount of screentime for young children have evolved significantly. Looking back, some of the pre-COVID suggestions such as “not more than 1 hour of screen time for kids under 2 years old” sounds unrealistic, if not downright unachievable!  Let’s face it, screens are definitely here to stay and have become a vital part of our children’s everyday life.  There is no way back and we need to embrace the new era and learn how to use them to the greatest benefit for our kids.  If we cannot set the screentime back to pre-COVID quantity, then we should make sure the kids are getting quality.    

Stay Sparky!

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